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Eat Like a Trainer: 8 Trainer-Approved Breakfast Recipes

Banana-PB-Overnight-Oats

Talk to most trainers, and it seems they are up at the crack of dawn, work all day with clients, work out themselves, and then often have business, family, friends and personal matters to address. It’s a lot, and they check every item off their list with energy to spare.

What gives them that go-go-go pep? It turns out it’s combination of drive and the right foods, starting with a nutritious breakfast. We asked personal trainers to share the recipe for their go-to morning meals.

From eggs to oats to pancakes and the requisite smoothie, here are eight trainer-endorsed recipes to fuel your day — and your muscles.

EGGS OVER VEGGIE HASH
This breakfast, from Maria Macsay, a yoga teacher and instructor at 305 Fitness and SLT in New York City, puts bars and smoothies to shame. “I love this simple, yet nutritious, meal post-workout because it’s the perfect balance of protein, fiber, healthy fats and carbs, which supports repair of muscle tissue and replenishes the body’s energy supply. I always feel satiated, nourished and light after this meal,” she says.

Eggs-over-Veggie-Hash

Ingredients

  • Coconut oil
  • 4–5 sliced Brussels sprouts
  • Sliced fennel, as desired
  • 1/2 cup cooked sweet potato, cubed
  • 4 chopped kale leaves
  • Himalayan sea salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1–2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1–2 tablespoons nutritional yeast

Directions

Warm coconut oil in a pan over medium-high heat. Add Brussels sprouts and fennel and sauté for 5 minutes. Add sweet potato, kale and a pinch of salt. Continue to sauté until vegetables are soft and a fork easily pierces the sprouts.

In a separate pan, cook eggs over-easy or over-medium, based on your preference.

Plate vegetables. Top with olive oil, eggs and nutritional yeast. Recipe makes 1 serving.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 470; Total Fat: 23g; Saturated Fat: 5g; Monounsaturated Fat: 10g; Cholesterol: 370mg; Sodium: 316mg; Carbohydrate: 36g; Dietary Fiber: 14g; Sugar: 5g; Protein: 27g

LOADED SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH AVOCADO & ROASTED POTATOES
Eggs are a classic breakfast, and who can say no to avocado? “I’m always on the move and start my mornings early, so my go-to healthy breakfast needs to be something quick and easy to whip up,” says Lita Lewis, founder of Thick Athletics Apparel and U by Kotex FITNESS partner. “This is one of my faves. What I love most about this recipe is how delicious it tastes. Not only does it fuel me with the energy I need to take on my day, it also leaves me feeling fully satisfied.” Lewis likes to serve her scramble with roasted potatoes (she makes them ahead of time so it’s just heat and eat) and half a fresh avocado.

Loaded-Scrambled-Eggs

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 egg white
  • Sea salt
  • Ground black pepper
  • 1 handful baby spinach
  • Spring onions, to taste
  • Cilantro, to taste
  • Halved cherry tomatoes, to taste
  • 1 dash paprika
  • Optional: roasted potatoes, avocado

Directions

Scramble eggs, egg whites and salt and pepper to taste in a bowl. Add to a frying pan with spinach, spring onions, cilantro and tomatoes. Cook to desired doneness. Serve topped with additional spring onions, cilantro and paprika. Recipe makes 1 serving. 

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 200; Total Fat: 10g; Saturated Fat: 3g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 370mg; Sodium: 251mg; Carbohydrate: 9g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 2g; Protein: 18g

OMELET “MUFFINS”
Take your omelet on the go by turning it into egg muffins, like these from the S.O.S. Food Plan by Ashley Borden, master trainer, lifestyle consultant and author. “I can easily eat these post-workout or, when I’m working early, just grab two and go,” she says. “The colorful veggies have antioxidants, and I usually top them with sliced avocado for more sustained energy and hot sauce.”

Omelet-Muffins

Ingredients

  • 8 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 8 ounces any lean meat
  • 2 cups chopped vegetables such as mushrooms, red bell peppers, broccoli, asparagus and/or onions
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 dash pepper
  • 1 dash garlic powder
  • 1 dash paprika

Directions

Preheat oven to 450°F and line a muffin pan with eight paper liners. Beat all ingredients together in a bowl. Divide among muffin cups and cook 18–20 minutes until set. Makes 4 servings at 2 muffins each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 219; Total Fat: 11g; Saturated Fat: 3g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 405mg; Sodium: 348mg; Carbohydrate: 0g; Dietary Fiber: 0g; Sugar: 0g; Protein: 24g

ENERGY-BOOSTING BREAKFAST COMBO
Eggs or oatmeal? Why not both, says Instagram fitness star Anna Victoria. “My favorite homemade breakfast is a veggie omelet and berry cinnamon oatmeal,” she says. “It’s quick and easy to make, it gives you energy to start off your day on the right foot, and it’s a macro-balanced, whole-food meal.” Try finding that at a fast-food joint or coffee shop.

Energy-Boosting-Breakfast-Combo

Ingredients

Veggie Omelet

  • 1/2 teaspoon olive oil
  • 2 whole eggs
  • 2 egg whites
  • 1 dash of pink Himalayan salt
  • Pepper, to taste
  • 2–3 cherry tomatoes, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons bell peppers, chopped

Directions

Heat oil in a cooking pan over medium-low heat, tilting the pan to spread oil.  While the pan is heating, crack eggs and egg whites in a bowl and mix. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Add tomato and pepper to the pan and sauté or 1–2 minutes. Pour eggs into the pan and let sit for 1–2 minutes. Once it is nearly cooked, use a spatula to flip one side of the omelet onto the other side. Let cook for 1 additional minute.

Ingredients

Oatmeal

  • 1/3 cup oats
  • 3 tablespoons coconut milk
  • 1 handful mixed raspberries and blueberries
  • Cinnamon, to taste

Directions

Mix oats and coconut milk in a bowl. Heat in the microwave per package directions. Top with raspberries, blueberries and cinnamon.

Recipe makes 1 serving at one omelet and one bowl of oatmeal each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 357; Total Fat: 15g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 3g; Cholesterol: 370mg; Sodium: 473mg; Carbohydrate: 33g; Dietary Fiber: 5g; Sugar: 11g; Protein: 24g

BANANA PEANUT BUTTER OVERNIGHT OATS
Overnight oats are the solution for people who don’t want to do more than pour cereal and milk into a bowl in the morning. Simply combine all ingredients in a bowl the night before, pop in the fridge, and you can grab and eat in the morning. This recipe from Karena Dawn and Katrina Scott, cofounders of Tone It Up, is delicious, too. “Peanut butter and bananas … what’s not to love? Plus, the fiber in the oats helps slowly release glucose into your body for steady energy levels,” they say. Pack it in a mason jar so you can take it to the office if you’re in a rush.

Banana-PB-Overnight-Oats

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup rolled oats
  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 4 teaspoons chia seeds
  • 2 teaspoons honey or maple syrup
  • 1 cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 scoop vanilla Tone It Up Protein
  • 1 banana, sliced

Directions

Combine everything in a bowl. Divide among two mason jars. Let sit in the fridge overnight. Recipe makes 2 servings.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 352; Total Fat: 14g; Saturated Fat: 2g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 235mg; Carbohydrate: 45g; Dietary Fiber: 10g; Sugar: 14g; Protein: 17g

SIMPE APPLE PANCAKES
Pancakes are one of those recipes that seems like it takes a long time, but actually comes together quickly. Try these tasty, no-sugar-added flapjacks from Cassey Ho, creator of POP Pilates and POPFLEX. “I love this breakfast because it’s not only delicious, it’s packed with protein and complex carbs to keep me full and energized throughout the morning,” she says.

Apple-Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce
  • 2 tablespoons almond flour
  • 2 tablespoons coconut flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon nut butter
  • 1/2 small apple, spiraled or chopped
  • 1 pinch of cinnamon, optional

Directions

In a small bowl, whisk together eggs, applesauce, almond flour, coconut flour and baking powder. Heat a griddle or pan over medium-low heat and coat with cooking spray. Reduce to low heat. Using a small measuring cup, scoop batter to make two pancakes. Cook for 2–3 minutes per side, or until firm and cooked through. Top one pancake with nut butter and cinnamon, if using. Place the other pancake on top and add apples and more cinnamon. Recipe makes 1 serving.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 356; Total Fat: 19g; Saturated Fat: 6g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 370mg; Sodium: 226mg; Carbohydrate: 26g; Dietary Fiber: 9g; Sugar: 11g; Protein: 20g

GREEN SMOOTHIE
Green smoothies run the gamut, from sweet and fruity to grassy and kale-y. For those who prefer to mask the flavor of their greens, try this recipe from celebrity trainer, nutritionist and author Harley Pasternak. “It’s packed with protein and fiber, which helps make you full and stay full. Plus, if you’re not a huge fan of green veggies, it’s a delicious way to get in your greens without hardly tasting them,” he says.

Green-Smoothie

Ingredients

  • 2 cups spinach leaves, packed
  • 1 ripe pear, unpeeled, cored and chopped
  • 15 green or red grapes
  • 3/4 cup fat-free plain Greek yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons chopped avocado
  • 12 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 cup water, skim milk or almond milk (if needed to get the blender going)

Directions

In a blender, combine all ingredients and blend until smoothie reaches desired consistency. Recipe makes 1 serving.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 245; Total Fat: 3g; Saturated Fat: 0g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 8mg; Sodium: 132mg; Carbohydrate: 39g; Dietary Fiber: 8g; Sugar: 24g; Protein: 20g

GLUTEN-FREE VEGAN PROTEIN PANCAKES 
ModelFIT trainer Rahel Ghebremichael turns to protein pancakes when she needs to fuel for a busy morning of teaching and training clients. “Teff is a small, gluten-free grain that I grew up on and recently started incorporating into my non-traditional foods,” she says. It has protein, fiber and iron to support your muscles.

Gluten-Free-Vegan-Protein-Pancakes

Ingredients

Dry

  • 1/2 cup teff flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon pink salt
  • 1/2 scoop chocolate protein powder

Wet

  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
  • 6 tablespoons water
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, divided
  • 2 teaspoons applesauce
  • 3/4 cups unsweetened almond milk

Directions

Mix the dry ingredients in a separate bowl and whisk several times.

Combine chia seeds and water and let sit for 2–3 minutes until a gel forms. Combine with 1 tablespoon coconut oil, applesauce and almond milk.

Mix wet and dry ingredients.

Set a pan over medium-high heat and grease with remaining tablespoon coconut oil. When hot, ladle in pancake mix to desired size and cook about 3–4 minutes, until pancake begins to bubble. Flip and cook another 3–4 minutes. Serve topped with maple syrup and fresh fruit as desired. Recipe makes 2 servings.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 300; Total Fat: 17g; Saturated Fat: 13g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 15mg; Sodium: 357mg; Carbohydrate: 26g; Dietary Fiber: 7g; Sugar: 1g; Protein: 10g

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Peanut Butter Breakfast Cookies | Recipe

Peanut Butter Breakfast Cookies

These delicious bite-sized peanut butter cookies are sure to be a popular treat for kids and adults-alike. Their timeless sweet and nutty flavor is perfectly paired with a smear of jam and glass of milk.

Peanut Butter Breakfast Cookies

Ingredients

  • 2 large (140 grams each), ripe bananas
  • 2 large (50 grams each) eggs
  • 2 1/2 cups (200 grams) rolled oats (certified gluten-free if necessary)
  • 1 cup (260 grams) peanut butter
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • Pinch of salt

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Spray a cookie sheet with cooking spray.

Add the ripe bananas and eggs into a medium mixing bowl. Mix with a spatula, mashing on the banana to get chunks as small as possible. Add the oats, peanut butter, honey, and salt, and stir until just combined. The mixture will get thick and hard to stir.

Use a 1/4 cup measure to portion cookie dough into 12 balls. Take each ball and split it in half to create 24 smaller balls. Roll each ball and lightly smash it between your palms to create a mini cookie.

Place the cookies on the baking sheet. Bake until the edges start to brown, 12 to 15 minutes.

Nutrition Information

Serves: 8 |  Serving Size: 3 cookies

Per serving: Calories: 299; Total Fat: 15g; Saturated Fat: 3g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 53mg; Sodium: 131mg; Carbohydrate: 34g; Dietary Fiber: 6g; Sugar: 13g; Protein: 11g

Nutrition Bonus: Potassium: 271mg; Iron: 13%; Vitamin A: 2%; Vitamin C: 4%; Calcium: 3% 

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Is ‘Second Breakfast’ Your Secret Weapon for Weight Loss?

“Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.” We’ve been hearing that mantra for decades from nutritionists and other health professionals who argue the benefits of jump-starting our engines for better health.

But now, some research is leading us to believe it might be better to eat not once, but twice, before the midday meal.

Let’s back up for a moment. Overall research on breakfast is contradicting. Some studies show eating a healthy breakfast leads to improved memory and cognition, elevates mood and even aids in weight-loss efforts. Other studies argue skipping breakfast doesn’t necessarily help or harm weight-loss efforts or metabolism, though it may be linked to lower energy levels during physical activity and less stable blood sugars in the afternoon and evening.

And now, a third party is suggesting a second breakfast may be as good (if not better) than just one. After following the eating habits of students at 12 middle schools for more than two years, researchers from Yale and the University of Connecticut found a double breakfast may actually increase your ability to maintain a healthy weight.

The reasoning? Not starting the day (and your metabolism) with breakfast may lead to overeating later in the day. In the study, frequent breakfast skippers had greater odds of becoming overweight or obese compared to those who had breakfast twice. The study also found no difference in weight-gain or weight-loss patterns between the students who ate two breakfasts versus those who ate just one.

Not convinced? Consider the habits of early risers, who set the alarm well before sunup. Researchers from the Obesity Society recently found that people who wake up early are more likely to eat a more balanced diet, inclusive of healthier, more high-energy and nutrient-dense foods than those who sleep in.

These individuals also have more time to be active and burn calories between morning and lunchtime, making the case for a second breakfast even stronger. Fueling up with a light snack before hitting the gym, pool or pavement, then refueling once you settle into your daily routine is almost necessary when burning several hundred calories before daybreak.


READ MORE > 4 SIGNS YOU’RE EATING TOO LITTLE WHEN TRYING TO LOSE WEIGHT


Intrigued? Here are some tips on how to take on this practice: Consider the idea of both first and second breakfasts more snack than meal. That pastry, Pop Tart, stack of pancakes or bowl of sugary cereal aren’t doing your brain or body any favors. Keep the morning meals small, simple and nutrient-dense, high in protein, healthy fats and fiber.

For your “first” breakfast, consider half a piece of whole-grain toast with nut butter or a few bites of protein-packed cottage cheese. Or try one of these recipes that can be prepped in advance: energy-dense quinoa bites or pistachio bites. They’re a perfect pre-workout energy boost that won’t weigh you down while you’re exercising and will tide you over during your morning commute.

Then go for something with a bit more staying power to keep you fueled until lunch for the “second” mid-morning breakfast. Try one of these simple make-ahead breakfasts with less than 300 calories, or one of these quick-and-easy options for people on the go.

As far as timing, try to space your first and second breakfast (or mini meals) 2–3 hours apart. If you rise at 5 or 6 a.m., have your first bite within 15 minutes of waking. Then aim to get the second, slightly more substantial breakfast in around 9, which should keep you fueled until lunch.

Don’t overthink or over complicate it. Make your morning mini meals simple, packed with lean protein, fiber and healthy fats. By keeping them small and spacing them a few hours apart, you’ll keep your energy levels elevated and maintain stable blood sugar levels. By planning ahead, you’ll not only be less likely to turn to junk foods at breakfast and lunch, but you’ll be better able to focus and concentrate, which has benefits far beyond breakfast.

The post Is ‘Second Breakfast’ Your Secret Weapon for Weight Loss? appeared first on Under Armour.

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A Healthy Hack on Ice Cream for Breakfast

If you asked them, my children would say they want a can of frosting for breakfast. Or the cake under it. Or, at minimum, the ice cream served alongside. The first two are absolutely out of the question. But that last morning mealtime fantasy? I’ve figured out a way to indulge it.

In truth, breakfast ice cream is more or less a frozen smoothie. Think: frozen chunks of fruit, icy cubes of dairy or nut milk and a bit of added sweetness. But instead of blending it into a drink to be slurped through a straw, it’s whipped into a frenzy in a food processor, served in a bowl and eaten with a spoon. To the child in all of us, it’s an indulgent dream made real: ice cream for breakfast.


READ MORE > 4-INGREDIENT BEET SMOOTHIE | RECIPE


Here’s a game plan for your spoonable, satisfying treat: In the body of a food processor, combine a 12-ounce bag of frozen peaches or raspberries with about a half-cup of yogurt, a pinch of sea salt, 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract and about 3 tablespoons of honey or your favorite sweetener. Seriously puree — two full minutes, scraping down the sides as needed — until it’s completely smooth. Top it with granola, maple syrup or fresh fruit for that sundae feeling.

For a more filling, well-rounded meal, freeze rich milk-like coconut, cashew or whole milk in ice cube trays. Yogurt works, too. Add a few cubes to the fruit mixture before pureeing. Eat it straight away or freeze it for a couple of hours until firm. This cold confection won’t stay fresh for long, so only make what you can eat in a day or two.

Not healthy enough for you? Here’s the base for frozen confection idea number 3: Bananas. Peel them. Cut them into quarters. Freeze them solid. Drop them into your food processor and whirl until totally smooth. Voila! Sweet, creamy and spoon-ready one-ingredient ice cream. This culinary magic trick is almost too good to be true. No one will judge you if you dust that with some sliced almonds or a sprinkle of cocoa powder. You will likely get applause if you scoop it on top of a waffle.


READ MORE > HOMEMADE BANANA “YOGURT” | RECIPE


I don’t often take culinary advice from children (“Pizza again?? Really?”), but sometimes the best breakfast ideas sprout from the mouths of babes.

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